November, 2006

Knowledge-at-work: Beliefs around learning

Knowledge-at-work

if you are involved with km, you likely will have reflected on the connection(s) between learning and knowledge. here are thoughts from anecdote shared in their monthly newsletter: people don't think they've learned anything until

ATS 40

The SaaS/On-Demand Benefits Test

SuccessFactors

A post over at Vendorprisey (with a very clever title) got me thinking about Software as a Service (SaaS) again. So often, conversations about SaaS involve an argument about what is and what is not considered SaaS. To a certain extent these discussions can be helpful -helping to classify different solutions into categories that imply certain attributes and […]. Uncategorized SaaS Software as a Service

ATS 40

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Knowledge-at-work: Perennial KM issues

Knowledge-at-work

What are some of the perennial KM issues business firms are dealing with? How to speed learning, increase awareness and share experiences. With an ever deceasing half-life of knowledge , just keeping up has become a major corporate

ATS 40

Knowledge-at-work: Knowledge managers

Knowledge-at-work

the knowledge manager may well be an endangered species as the km meme fades and firms rush to stay abreast of complexity, social networking and chaos theory. so exactly what did a knowledge manager do and what were they responsible for

Why Smoking Costs Employers More Than They Realize

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Knowledge-at-work: KM practices

Knowledge-at-work

which km practices are the most important in your opinion? i've been giving this some thought and have this short list: facilitate conversations - this is where connections are made, trust is built, new knowledge emerges

Dangerous jargon

SuccessFactors

A colleague sent me this article which encourages us all to get hip to the dangers of jargon. According to a survey by YouGov, 40+% of people think phrases like “blue sky thinking,” and “getting our ducks in a row,” makes bosses look “untrustworthy and weak.” ” But, perhaps even more interestingly, people apparently have this stuff on […