Free 2021 California Employment Laws White Paper

HRWatchdog

Even in a months-long pandemic, the California Legislature passed a bunch of new employment laws — some COVID-19-related, some not — that Governor Gavin Newsom signed into law on or before his September 30, 2020, deadline. CalChamber members can access the white paper here.

Free 2020 Midyear Employment Law White Paper

HRWatchdog

You’ll also learn about court decisions on discrimination, background report disclosures and employee compensation during security screenings, to name a few, as well as other bills in the California Legislature that would expand state leaves of absence laws.

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Free 2019 Midyear Employment Law White Paper

HRWatchdog

Download this free white paper now. We are over halfway through 2019, and as always, you can count on the Golden State for interesting developments in employment law. Luckily, CalChamber’s employment law experts highlight the significant developments so far this year in CalChamber’s free 2019 Midyear Employment Law Update white paper.

Download the New 2020 California Labor Laws White Paper

HRWatchdog

Check out the latest white paper on significant 2020 California Labor Laws! Ring in the new decade already prepared for the latest updates to California’s labor laws! CalChamber members can access the white paper here.

New 2018 Midyear Employment Law White Paper

HRWatchdog

We are over halfway through 2018, and yet again, California employers have been busy paying attention to plenty of new employment law developments. Luckily, CalChamber’s employment law experts highlight the significant developments so far this year in CalChamber’s free 2018 Midyear Employment Law Update white paper. CalChamber members can download the white paper from the HR Library; nonmembers can download it here.

Midyear Employment Law Update White Paper

HRWatchdog

Download the 2015 Midyear Employment Law Update now! California’s mandatory paid sick leave law is the story of the year. On July 1, employers had to start providing the benefit to employees. The governor also signed “clean up” amendments to the law that were effective on July 13. It’s already been a busy year with several noteworthy developments that demand employers’ attention. CalChamber members can download the white paper from HRCalifornia.

New 2016 California Employment Laws White Paper Is Ready

HRWatchdog

CalChamber’s employment law counsel wrapped up their analysis of the significant pieces of employment-related legislation that Governor Brown signed into law and prepared a white paper summarizing their effects on California employers. An Overview of New 2016 Laws Affecting California Employers is now available for nonmembers to download. CalChamber members can also access a full discussion of the new laws on HRCalifornia.

New Employment Law Trends White Paper Now Available

HRWatchdog

A new white paper from CalChamber summarizes current employment law trends and offers practical advice for employers to minimize their potential workplace law liability. The white paper analyzes the “mixed bag” of employment law developments from new legislation and court decisions. Learn about: California’s mandatory paid sick leave law; Reasonable accommodation; Enforcement actions from regulatory agencies; and.

New California Required Harassment Prevention Training FAQs White Paper

HRWatchdog

Our latest white paper answers all your questions about the new harassment prevention training requirements. You’ve all heard the news that California employers with five or more employees located anywhere must now provide sexual harassment prevention training to all employees — not just supervisors, as was the previous law. CalChamber’s new white paper, Required Harassment Prevention Training FAQs , answers all of those questions.

New 2019 California Labor Laws White Paper Is Ready

HRWatchdog

The latest white paper provides a breakdown of significant California labor laws for 2019. CalChamber’s employment law counsel wrapped up their analysis of the significant pieces of employment-related legislation that Governor Brown signed into law. They prepared a white paper summarizing these laws’ effects on California employers for January 2019 and beyond.

New White Paper Highlights 2017 Laws Affecting Small Businesses

HRWatchdog

Small employers in California often don’t have the luxury of a dedicated HR department. Employers need to be aware of significant changes in key areas, such as the state minimum wage. Other new laws make small changes to different parts of existing law or may relate only to specific industries. The 10 New 2017 Laws Affecting California Small Businesses white paper is available for members and nonmembers to download.

LifeWorks

     

New California Employment Laws Affecting Businesses in 2017 and Beyond

HRWatchdog

These new laws will affect California employers’ day-to-day operations and policies in 2017 and beyond. CalChamber’s employment law counsel wrapped up their analysis of the significant pieces of employment-related legislation that Governor Brown signed into law. The 2017 legislative session produced new laws that will affect California employers’ day-to-day operations and policies in 2017 and beyond.

On the Road: Employment Law Updates Seminars

HRWatchdog

The New Year brings many things — resolutions, cold weather and CalChamber’s annual Employment Law Updates seminars. Last week, our employment law experts packed their bags and began the annual seminar road trip with a visit to Southern California. Numerous new laws, cases and pending regulations entertained attendees. Attendees always make these seminars interactive and engaging for everyone — including the employment law experts.

2016 Midyear Employment Law Update

HRWatchdog

CalChamber’s new white paper explains important changes to employment law. It’s already been a busy 2016 for employers, with lots of action from the California Legislature, federal and state agencies, local governments and our courts. CalChamber’s free 2016 Midyear Employment Law Update white paper recaps some of the more significant developments to date in these areas: Wage and Hour.

Governor Signs New Employment Laws for 2019

HRWatchdog

Governor Jerry Brown signed several key employment law bills that businesses need to be aware of for the coming year. With a few strokes of his pen on September 30th, 2018, the last day to sign or veto bills, Governor Jerry Brown altered the landscape for California employers in a number of significant ways. Here are some of the new laws taking effect in January 2019 that employers should anticipate: Assembly Bills.

New Year, New Labor Laws to Know

HRWatchdog

Employers need to make sure to be aware of new labor laws that could affect them in the new year. As you draw up your list of New Year’s resolutions, resolve to take a few moments to familiarize yourself with the new employment laws that you’ll need to know in the coming year. CalChamber’s employment law counsel analyzed the significant bills that Governor Jerry Brown signed into law and prepared a white paper summarizing their effects on California employers.

New California Employment Laws Affect Businesses in 2018 and Beyond

HRWatchdog

Several new laws will affect California employers’ daily operations and policies in 2018 and beyond. The California Chamber of Commerce today released the list of new employment laws scheduled to take effect in 2018 and beyond that will affect California employers’ daily operations and policies. Some new laws made significant changes while others made small changes to existing law.

Independent Contractor or Employee? California’s Worker Classification Law Revised

HRWatchdog

AB 5 also created numerous industry exceptions to the ABC test, which, if various conditions were met, the old common law test would apply instead. This year, AB 2257 adds more industry exceptions and some revisions to California’s worker classification law, which are now in effect.

CalChamber Releases List of New Employment Laws Affecting Businesses in 2016

HRWatchdog

The California Chamber of Commerce today released the list of new employment laws scheduled to take effect in 2016 or earlier that will have an impact on businesses in California. The summaries below appear in a CalChamber white paper, available to download here. The CalChamber also reminds employers that the minimum wage increases on January 1, 2016, to $10 an hour. It still applies to employers with 25 or more employees,” notes Frank. “An

HRWatchdog’s Top 2020 Posts to Remember in 2021

HRWatchdog

Usually, around this time, we take a fond look back at the previous year to see the top employment-related stories California businesses faced. New California Employment Laws Effective Now, Coming January 1. CalChamber members can access the white paper here.

Sexual Harassment: What You Don’t Know Can Hurt You

HRWatchdog

Each year, more than 6,000 charges of alleged sexual harassment are filed with the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC), and this does not include the charges filed with state and local fair employment agencies. CalChamber employment law counsel prepared a white paper, 10 Things You Might Not Know About Sexual Harassment: What You Don’t Know Can Hurt You , to educate employers on sexual harassment prevention. Harassment white paper

Make Sure You Correctly Classify Employees and Independent Contractors

HRWatchdog

Mislabeling a worker as an independent contractor can expose employers to significant legal liability. Federal enforcement agencies, such as the Department of Labor (DOL) and the Internal Revenue Service (IRS), and California enforcement agencies, such as the Department of Industrial Relations (DIR) and the Employment Development Department (EDD), have made it a top priority to crack down on the misclassification of workers as independent contractors. Other mistakes employers make.

Forget what you heard. THIS, right here, will be the biggest employment law concern for employers in 2020.

The Employer Handbook

SimmeD [ CC BY-SA ] I’ve seen a lot of ink spilled by employment lawyers about how #MeToo, new overtime rules, medical marijuana, and salary history questions will be the significant issues with which employers would have to deal in 2020.

Make Sure You Are Correctly Complying With California PSL

HRWatchdog

Even though California’s Paid Sick Leave (PSL) law took effect last year, California employers continue to be confused on how to comply with the new law, especially when the law was amended a few weeks after the July 1, 2015, start date. CalChamber employment law counsel prepared a white paper, 10 Things You Might Not Know About California’s Paid Sick Leave Law , focusing on areas of the law employers may have overlooked or are perplexed by.

[Infographic] Strange Employment Laws Around the World

Get Hppy

If you’re under constant strain, you’ll appreciate how certain countries’ unique employment laws influence the work environment. And yes, some of these laws are beneficial to the workers specifically. In Portugal, your employer can’t fire you. Because when employment laws were drafted no-one added a termination period. The unique laws tip the employment situation in your favour. Do you take current employment laws for granted?

Looking Behind and Ahead: “Top 8” Posts of 2018

HRWatchdog

2018 was quite a year for employers with several new laws and regulations: an intern test, laws on using salary history in hiring decisions, national origin protections and many others. Tax Reform Impact on Employers and Employees. We summarized some of the most important Tax Bill provisions impacting employers with respect to their employees. Governor Signs New California Employment Laws for 2019. General 2018 employment laws 2019 Employment Law

New Year, New Laws to Comply With

HRWatchdog

Employers will need to be aware of significant changes. As we head toward the new year, don’t forget there are several new laws affecting California employers in 2017. CalChamber’s employment law counsel analyzed the significant pieces of legislation that Governor Brown signed into law and prepared a white paper summarizing their effects on California employers. Gail Cecchettini Whaley, CalChamber Employment Law Counsel/Content.

Temporary Restraining Order Granted Against AB 51

HRWatchdog

AB 51 is the bill that prohibits employers from requiring an arbitration agreement as a condition of employment for the resolution of any claim under the Labor Code or Fair Employment and Housing Act (FEHA). Nonmembers can request a free copy of this white paper.

Major Employment-Related Bills Sent to California Governor

HRWatchdog

This year, employment-related bills generated some of the biggest buzz. CalChamber is urging members to contact the Governor to have him veto one employment-related job killer bill prohibiting arbitration of labor and employment claims as a condition of employment. For those excepted industries, the common law Borello multi-factor test applies. However, because the bill was hastily written and signed into law, many questions were left after its passage.

Governor Acts on Employment-Related Bills

HRWatchdog

has now signed or vetoed employment-related legislation passed by the California Legislature in 2016. New Laws. A few of the new laws that employers need to be aware of include: Increases to the state minimum wage. The minimum wage rate will increase incrementally to $15 per hour by 2022 (2023 for smaller employers). Nonmembers can access the minimum wage white paper here.). Other new laws will also affect California businesses.

AB 5 Injunction Overturned

HRWatchdog

Once upon a (pre-pandemic) time, one of employers’ most pressing concerns was the independent contractor law (also known as AB 5 ) that took effect in 2020, codifying the California Supreme Court’s strict “ABC” test for classifying workers as either employees or independent contractors.

Being Thankful in 2020

HRWatchdog

In fact, studies show that employers don’t always have to give employees’ more money or tangible benefits to recognize them for their work (although those don’t hurt!) — most employees actually prefer a verbal or written “thank you.”. Yes, new employment laws are here.

New Year, New Laws to Comply With

HRWatchdog

As we head toward the new year, don’t forget there are several new laws affecting California employers in 2015. CalChamber’s employment law counsel analyzed the significant pieces of legislation that Governor Brown signed into law and prepared a white paper summarizing their effects on California employers. Gail Cecchettini Whaley, CalChamber Employment Law Counsel/Content.

What Prop. 22 Means for Employers

HRWatchdog

In this episode of The Workplace podcast , CalChamber Executive Vice President and General Counsel Erika Frank and employment law expert Jennifer Shaw discuss the passage of Proposition 22, which classifies app-based drivers as independent contractors, and what that means for California employers.

Pay Stub Problems Led to Lawsuit and Settlement

HRWatchdog

California employers must provide employees with an accurate, itemized wage statement, either as a paystub or a separate written document. Gail Cecchettini Whaley, CalChamber Employment Law Counsel/Content. CalChamber’s new What’s In Your Wage Statement white paper identifies nine categories of information that must be included on wage statements and offers practical suggestions for employers on minimizing their potential liability.

Questions About California’s New Independent Contractor Law? State Creates AB 5 Resource Website

HRWatchdog

The new AB 5 website also contains links to various helpful resources for both workers and employers. This website is meant to be a resource for California’s workers and employers to ensure a smooth implementation of the law,” said Su in a press release.

Affordable Care Act (#ACA): Don’t Forget Your 2017 Requirements!

HR Bartender

(Editor’s Note: Today’s post is brought to you by our friends at ComplyRight , providers of practical, affordable products and services that help employers of all sizes streamline essential tasks and compliance with federal, state, and local employment laws. Just in case you missed it, Congress passed the “ Tax Cuts and Jobs Act of 2017 ” and it was signed into law by the President last month. So, the answer is to do your filings as required by law.