NY-Toronto Law Firm KM Summit 2008 in Boston

Knowledge Musings

Doug Cornelius asked me to participate in the NY-Toronto Law Firm KM Summit 2008, which for some reason was held in Boston this year. Carl & Dan recommended having a look at Emergence: The Connected Lives of Ants, Brains, Cities, and Software by Steven Johnson in terms of understanding the importance of Enterprise 2.0 This is a group of lawyers (primarily) who are very interested in knowledge management in the legal profession.

Performance Appraisal Software

Reviewsnap

Capterra , a leading online destination for business software buyers, recently released a survey in which more than 1000 respondents shared what type of software their businesses are looking to buy. Performance Appraisal Software was desired by 13% of those who participated in the survey.

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Annual Subscription or Licensed Software

Reviewsnap

Currently ReviewSNAP is offered as a annual subscription Web-based performance review system. However, we are considering offering ReviewSNAP as a licensed product as well. So, rather than subscribing on an annual basis you will pay a one time fee and ReviewSNAP will be hosted on your server. Our question is which option would your company prefer? We would appreciate any feedback you have to offer.

What Happens When a Luddite Becomes a Tech Entrepreneur? Great Software.

Nobscot

I was wondering last night, as I began to "tweet" for the first time, how a semi-luddite like myself could successfully lead a technology company like Nobscot Corporation.I don''t use a cell phone. I don''t like to talk to people on the phone when I''m not in work mode and when I am in work mode I like to be at my desk concentrating not at the grocery store.I have an old T-Mobile Sidekick that I

Transparent Office: Supply and demand 2.0

Transparent Office

Transparent Office Michael Idinopuloss Blog on Social Software in the Enterprise Home Archives Subscribe « McAfee on Widening the Flow | Main | A Moment of Clarity » January 30, 2008 Supply and demand 2.0 A primary reason why Ive started an external blog is to share and elicit insights about how organizations are using social software to improve the way they work. Posted by: son | January 30, 2008 at 10:58 PM Thanks for the comment.

Transparent Office: Email overload: what went wrong?

Transparent Office

Transparent Office Michael Idinopuloss Blog on Social Software in the Enterprise Home Archives Subscribe « Whos Afraid of Orphaned Pages? Main | McAfee on Widening the Flow » January 17, 2008 Email overload: what went wrong? Posted by: Simon Carswell | January 20, 2008 at 12:57 PM Simon, Thanks for the reference. Posted by: Michael Idinopulos | January 21, 2008 at 10:01 PM I can think of two motivations that may be the cause of increased email usage.

Invest Wisely In Information Technology

Reviewsnap

It seems that as soon as you purchase and install a new piece of hardware or software, its replacement is hitting the market. Or the business has grown or changed enough that old software isn''t compatible with the way the business operates. But before you select a particular system or software package, do your homework. Major software changes or upgrades can disrupt business if not carefully planned for. The rate of change in information technology is staggering.

Brokerage and Closure

Transparent Office

Some time ago, I blogged about the difference between in-the-flow and above-the-flow uses of wikis and social software more broadly. My conclusion was that social software delivers maximum business value when workers use it to collaborate transparently "in the flow" for things like managing projects, writing trip reports, capturing meeting notes, etc. On a pragmatic level, this means that companies should pursue a range of use cases for their social software implementations.

4 Solution Areas

Transparent Office

So my Socialtext colleagues and I spent some serious time around the whiteboard talking about patterns we're seeing--not sociological or usability patterns, but patterns of business value being generated using wikis and other forms of social software. One of the questions I get a lot is "What do you use a wiki for?" It's a fundamental question, but I've been frustrated for a while at how long-winded and imprecise the answers are that people give to it.

Transparent Office: A Moment of Clarity

Transparent Office

Transparent Office Michael Idinopuloss Blog on Social Software in the Enterprise Home Archives Subscribe « Supply and demand 2.0 | Main | McKinsey on Informal Networks » February 16, 2008 A Moment of Clarity I do my best thinking when Im talking. Posted by: Jing-Jing | February 18, 2008 at 02:08 PM Here is my response. link] Posted by: Stella Porto | February 19, 2008 at 01:31 PM How about "nurture"?

Go Paperless and Automate Your Reviews

Reviewsnap

There is no software implementation or implementation costs and you will have access to the system as soon as you have subscribed to ReviewSNAP. Performance reviews are an important process to a company''s success, but many organizations use manual processes or inadequate software as their framework for managing performance evaluations. If you are looking for the simplest answer to transitioning from manual paper reviews to an automated system then ReviewSNAP is your answer.

McAfee on Widening the Flow

Transparent Office

Transparent Office Michael Idinopuloss Blog on Social Software in the Enterprise Home Archives Subscribe « Email overload: what went wrong? » January 22, 2008 McAfee on Widening the Flow HBSs Andrew McAfee recently blogged on " widening the flow " Building on my distinction between in-the-flow and above-the-flow , McAfee argues eloquently that the organizational benefit of Enterprise 2.0 Jason Posted by: Jason | January 28, 2008 at 08:03 PM Jason, I agree.

Foundation 2.0: Are Networks the Future of Philanthropy?

Transparent Office

A music school in Philadelphia wants to know whether it should invest in commercial software to manage its box office. A recent conversation with Brook Manville reminded me of a question that has been puzzling me for a while: Why don't philanthropic foundations think more about networks? The traditional philanthropic model revolves around money. Foundations have it, and nonprofits need it. So the foundations give it to the nonprofits in the form of a grant.

Transparent Office: McKinsey on Informal Networks

Transparent Office

Transparent Office Michael Idinopuloss Blog on Social Software in the Enterprise Home Archives Subscribe « A Moment of Clarity | Main | Work-in-Progress Culture » March 02, 2008 McKinsey on Informal Networks Catching up on some back reading, I ran across Harnessing the Power of Informal Networks in the Q4 edition of McKinsey Quarterly. link] Posted by: John Tropea | March 19, 2008 at 09:20 PM Have you checked out www.keyhubs.com?

Tools 40

The Bamboo Project Blog: The Social Media Spiral

The Bamboo Project Blog

January 13, 2008 in nptech , personal learning environment , professional development , technology stewardship , Web 2.0 | Permalink TrackBack TrackBack URL for this entry: [link] Listed below are links to weblogs that reference The Social Media Spiral : Comments You can follow this conversation by subscribing to the comment feed for this post. Posted by: Shannon Ritter | January 13, 2008 at 11:23 AM Shannon has it. Playing with technology and learning new software is the easy bit.

Tools 40

When the Dog Catches the Car

Transparent Office

According to most theorists of social software, getting started is the only hard part. What do you do when a wiki pilot succeeds? This is a question I'm hearing more and more. Usually the conversation goes something like this: "We launched a wiki pilot. It went great. Everyone in our group uses the wiki. We can't live without it. We'd love to see the rest of the company follow our lead. But.they're not." In theory this shouldn't be happening.

Conduct Effective Performance Reviews

Reviewsnap

One major advantage to these systems is that they do not require you to build or load software on any of your computers. There is an age old process conducted in most organizations, large and small, known as performance review or performance appraisal (the term performance review will be used primarily in this article). The importance of providing feedback to employees cannot be overstated.

Best HR Software Providers: Standard-setters in performance tracking to 401(K) management

HR Digest

Finding a suitable software provider that meets your organization’s needs is tricky. Luckily, not all of them are actual HR software providers, but you get the idea, right? Top Human Resources (HR) Software Providers. Gusto – Best HR software for payroll management.

How to create products customers love

Knowledge Musings

Just have a look at most business software, and you know the problem. Cagan suggests, as he did in his previous webinar, that there should be about 2 user experience people per product manager for companies that sell user-facing software. I attended a webinar by Marty Cagan of the Silicon Valley Product Group, where he discussed some a "top ten" elements from his new book, Inspired: How to Create Products Customers Love. The webinar will be archived at the FeaturePlan website.

Why Do You Want This Job?

Evil HR Lady

They have a opening for software engineer job. Because not only do I not want a job as a software engineer, my desire to move to India is, well, low. But apparently you want to be a software engineer. Since the position is for a software engineer and they are only looking for 300 words, they aren't after brilliant prose that will be published in the company newsletter. I am a graduate looking for jobs.

Why Your Business Needs Regulatory Compliance Software 

360 factors

Management often wonders where this need for regulatory compliance software suddenly came from, and we cannot really blame them for thinking this way. Banks and financial institutions have been running perfectly fine for centuries now without needing financial compliance software, so why do they need them now? The first factor that creates the need for compliance monitoring software is the stricter regulatory environment banks and financial institutions now face.

Eating for today or fishing for tomorrow

Knowledge Musings

So, when you suggest that social software is a great mechanism to get people connected, it's no wonder that people aren't particularly interested. Sigurd Rinde has a piece on the purpose of information technology that rings a bell for me. A quote from the close of Teaching how to fish - IT's ultimate purpose should do the trick: IT today is mostly built so as to satisfy your craving for yesteryear's menu, don't get caught by the lure of that.

Social Bookmarking in the Enterprise at MITRE

Knowledge Musings

The IT organization looked at buying commercial software, but have decided to stay with their own project on top of Scuttle. The Boston KM Forum topic this evening was Tag Me! Social Bookmarking in the Enterprise , a talk by Laurie Damianos of MITRE ( an interview with her at CMU ). Going into the talk, the most interesting thing to me is Laurie's title: she's a Lead Artificial Intelligence Engineer - Can I get that job? Why social bookmarking in the enterprise?

The Total Cost of Ownership

Workday

This is the ideal time for Software-as-a-Service The markets stink, the global economic mood is depressed, people aren’t spending money and every day the papers and Web news sites have new, bad news. Strange as it may seem, I’m excited.

KM professorship at Kent State

Knowledge Musings

Facilities include a state-of-the-art usability lab ([link] fully-digital classrooms with the most current hardware and software, state-of-the-art distance education tools, whether through interactive television or web-based synchronous or asynchronous learning objects, and instructional designer support.Interest in asynchronous digital distance learning is preferred. Applications will be accepted until the position is filled; review of applicants will begin December 1, 2008.

Webinar: Ten Tips for Driving Better Project Outcomes

Knowledge Musings

The abstract given was: It’s no secret that in the battle to bring effective business software to market on time and on budget, business analysts are on the front lines. The discussion was centered around the idea of developing requirements for a new product (software typically). Business changes, so requirements change, so software must be flexible. Deliver working software incrementally!

Putting the Focus on People

Workday

Now, some of you out there may say that enterprise software solves complex problems and therefore it must be hard to use in order to accomplish its mission. Cringely noted in a recent post, big enterprise software companies regularly made their software harder to use than it needs to be But as Robert X.

Personal Productivity - is that what I really want

Knowledge Musings

And a note at the middle level of working on the right things: Jordan Frank pointed to an article by Sarah Houghton-Jan on Being Wired or Being Tired: 10 Ways to Cope with Information Overload from Ariadne, July 2008. Look for Software Help. Matt Cornell has a nice piece on The real reasons for the modern productivity movement that he sums up with. Productivity is neither a cult nor a fad. It's a search for meaning. -- (me :-). Interesting claim.

Response to Jim H's blog 'Keep the Performance Reviews!'

Working Girl

Talent management is a human problem first and a software problem second. Not that this is a criticism of talent management solutions because in all fairness, management of people isn’t a software problem. [link] I think we should keep the reviews but with less emphasis on the automation. I’ve heard it argued that canned feedback is better than nothing.

Thoughts about Talent Management

Working Girl

In my role as an HCM strategist for a business software company I’ve been thinking about talent management and have identified what I think of as five popular ‘myths’ about talent management – there are probably more but these are my favorite five: Myth 1: Talent Management and Core HR are separate functions – this seems to be the de facto position of leading talent management solutions, but effective talent management requires consolidated access to employee, staffing and business data.

Performance MANAGEMENT

Working Girl

Even more depressingly, it seems that many companies are looking for software solutions to supplement poor management rather than improve it, rather like treating the symptoms rather than looking for a cure. When you get right down to it, Performance Management is about negotiation. Each side wants something.

Community gardens need their gardeners

Knowledge Musings

Here are some of the things I did to build and grow the B2B niche Catalyze community (for professionals who design and define software) from 0 to over 4,000 members in 13 months - and things that define “Active Community Management”: Member communication. Tom Humbarger gave us some musings about similarities between Community Managers and Quarterbacks.

Why Do You Want This Job?

Evil HR Lady

They have a opening for software engineer job. Because not only do I not want a job as a software engineer, my desire to move to India is, well, low. But apparently you want to be a software engineer. Since the position is for a software engineer and they are only looking for 300 words, they aren't after brilliant prose that will be published in the company newsletter. I am a graduate looking for jobs.

HCM is good for the Green

SuccessFactors

Recently Saugatuck Technologies released a study showing that SaaS (Software-as-a-Service) Human Capital Management software contributes at least 2-3% to top line growth – definitely good news for companies seeking more green. An article in this week’s San Francisco Chronicle made me start to think about another kind of green – the environment. Human capital management […].

Change Can be a Good Thing - Annrai O'Toole and Workday the opposite of ERP

Workday

For a whole set of very obvious reasons, the relational database, has a crucial role in any business software system. A lot of the debate about “change” in ERP gets focused on the database. Upon first encountering ERP, many of my smart friends would tell me that that the big source of system complexity is the thousands of database tables. Indeed, a colleague of mine from a very large bank told me they spent $50m a year to keep a global, single instance of a traditional ERP system running.

YouTube on your Windows Mobile phone

Knowledge Musings

The basic solution: install software that can play the videos because the vendors / Microsoft can't be bothered to make this work out of the box. It's amazing to me that smartphones sold today cannot play YouTube (and other) videos and multimedia files. Why in the world should I be limited? (I I think the claim is that YouTube and other videos are heavy consumers of bandwidth, so the providers don't like to make it easy.) Here is what I found to make Windows Mobile 6 work.

Video 40

Tick Box KM

Knowledge Musings

Another is an interesting article ( Computing, 7 Feb 2008 ) by software professional, Peter Merrick, who says "it is not project management that is of interest, but project delivery. Two recent things prompted me to address this topic. One is for a voluntary organisation I work for where one of our supporters would like our volunteers (people like me) to become accredited advisors. After all we would "tick all the boxes".

Necessary But Not Sufficient, 2nd pass

Knowledge Musings

This time the focus is on the principals at a large software vendor (ERP systems) and their primary systems integrator. I enjoyed the comment by the software engineer that many of the change requests that come from customers have to do with their desire to re-implement many of the old rules into the new software - thereby ham-stringing any hopes for benefits. But, in my view, that is just an example of how the software could be used.

Whatever happened to.?

Knowledge Musings

COPE - a fascinating concept mapping software developed by Colin Eden. Themescape (Cartia) - this excellent visualisation software for knowledge mapping was bought by Aurigin and became part of its patent analysis software. Aurigin went bankrupt in 2002 and its patent software assets acquired by Micropatent (part of IHI) who incorporated it into it's Aureka software. What this article illustrates is that many good KM software solutions often start as niche.

Putting the I back in IT

Knowledge Musings

Some persuasive enterprise solutions salesperson has sold a perfectly good piece of software, often with many 'bells and whistles', more than most users can take advantage of. Ever since knowledge management took off, organisations have looked to IT to provide a 'silver bullet'. All along I've stressed the need to put back the I (Information) into IT. Now a recent report from TFPL and Cap Gemini (see the Information Opportuntity Report ) says the same thing in a slightly different way.